Thursday, May 31, 2018

Review: How Far She's Come by Holly Brown

Title: How Far She's Come
Author: Holly Brown
Year Published: 2018


Genre: Adult fiction (mystery)
Pages: 416
Rating: 4.5 out of 5

Location (my 2018 Google Reading map)USA (NY)

FTC Disclosure: I was given a copy of this book by the publisher for a review

Summary (from the inside flap of the book): Twenty-four-year-old Cheyenne Florian has received the kind of job offer that dreams are made of. On the strength of a few vlogs, she's recruited to be the new correspondent on the recently hatched Independent News Network, INN.

INN strives to be exciting and innovative. Yet once Cheyenne joins the INN team, she finds age-old dynamics in play. A few of the female staff resent her meteoric rise, while some of the men are only too happy to welcome her. Then there's the diary left for her anonymously, written by a female broadcast journalist icon named Elyse Rohrbach in 1991. The mysterious diary is accompanied by a note, urging Cheyenne to learn from the past. Is it meant as inspiration and friendly advice--or as a warning? Still, she can't see how it has anything to do with her...until disturbing events begin.

As more unsettling events unfold--events that appear as if someone is engineering the similarities in Cheyenne's life to match those of Elyse's past--it becomes clear that she is a pawn in a twisted game. But Cheyenne is determined to rewrite the rules and play her own game. Though they're separated by more than twenty-five years, Elyse and Cheyenne are learning the same lesson: nothing is more threatening than a woman who doesn't yet know her own power.

 


Purchase Links: HarperCollins | Amazon | Barnes & Noble

Author Links: Website and Facebook 
Review: In the first 60 pages or so I got pretty sick and tired of hearing how good looking Cheyenne is and how people treat her because of it. I get it. She's beautiful. She gets stared at. Move on. But by the time this book gets going, her beauty is important and relevant.

While this is a story of a young, beautiful, and intelligent woman who wants to make a name for herself in broadcast journalism, it is also a story of #metoo. But not just #metoo. It takes a look at how men are still at the helm of large corporations, how we have a culture of allowing men to sexually harass and assault women without consequences and with others--both men and women--standing by and allowing it to happen. Women are some of the worst offenders; we allow our jealousy of one another and our need to succeed to get in the way of doing the right thing.

This is a good story that is riveting in it's final 100 pages when the reader wonders who will get caught, who is behind it all, and will Cheyenne figure it out. And if she does, what will or can she do about it?

Challenges for which this counts: none

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